Quality of mobile air temperature and atmospheric pressure observations from the 2010 development test environment experiment

AMS Citation:
Anderson, A., M. Chapman, S. Drobot, A. Tadesse, B. Lambi, G. M. Wiener, and P. Pisano, 2012: Quality of mobile air temperature and atmospheric pressure observations from the 2010 development test environment experiment. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51, 691-701, doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-0126.1.
Date:2012-04-01
Resource Type:article
Title:Quality of mobile air temperature and atmospheric pressure observations from the 2010 development test environment experiment
Abstract: The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of these data, over 239 000 air temperature and atmospheric pressure observations were obtained from nine vehicles and were compared with a weather station set up at the testing site. The observations from the vehicles were first run through the NCAR Vehicle Data Translator (VDT). As part of the VDT, quality-checking (QCh) tests were applied; pass rates from these tests were examined and were stratified by meteorological and nonmeteorological factors. Statistics were then calculated for air temperature and atmospheric pressure in comparison with the weather station, and the effects of different meteorological and nonmeteorological factors on the statistics were examined. Overall, temperature measurements showed consistent agreement with the weather station, and there was little impact from the QCh process or stratifications--a result that demonstrated the feasibility of collecting mobile temperature observations from vehicles. Atmospheric pressure observations were less well matched with surface validation, the degree of which varied with the make and model of vehicle. Therefore, more work must be done to improve the quality of these observations if atmospheric pressure from vehicles is to be useful.
Subject(s):Field experiments, Transportation meteorology
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2012 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be "fair use" under Section 107 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law (17 USC, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the Society's permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form on servers, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statements, requires written permission or license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policies, available from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or amspubs@ametsoc.org. Permission to place a copy of this work on this server has been provided by the AMS. The AMS does not guarantee that the copy provided here is an accurate copy of the published work.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7m04632
Publisher's Version: 10.1175/JAMC-D-11-0126.1
Author(s):
  • Amanda Anderson - NCAR/UCAR
  • Michael Chapman - NCAR/UCAR
  • Sheldon Drobot - NCAR/UCAR
  • Alemu Tadesse - NCAR/UCAR
  • Brice Lambi - NCAR/UCAR
  • Gerry Wiener - NCAR/UCAR
  • Paul Pisano
  • Random Profile

    PROJ SCIENTIST II

    Recent & Upcoming Visitors