Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

AMS Citation:
Yu, P., O. B. Toon, C. Bardeen, M. J. Mills, T. Fan, J. M. English, and R. Neely, 2015: Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme. Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 7, 865-914, doi:10.1002/2014MS000421.
Date:2015-06-01
Resource Type:article
Title:Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme
Abstract: A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ∼2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ∼32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2015 American Geophysical Union.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7t43v9g
Publisher's Version: 10.1002/2014MS000421
Author(s):
  • Pengfei Yu
  • Owen Toon
  • Charles Bardeen - NCAR/UCAR
  • Michael Mills - NCAR/UCAR
  • Tianyi Fan
  • Jason English
  • Ryan Neely - NCAR/UCAR
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