NASA's tropical cloud systems and processes (TCSP) experiment: Investigating tropical cyclogenesis and hurricane intensity change

AMS Citation:
Halverson, J., and Coauthors, 2007: NASA's tropical cloud systems and processes (TCSP) experiment: Investigating tropical cyclogenesis and hurricane intensity change. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 88, 867-882, doi:10.1175/BAMS-88-6-867.
Date:2007-06-01
Resource Type:article
Title:NASA's tropical cloud systems and processes (TCSP) experiment: Investigating tropical cyclogenesis and hurricane intensity change
Abstract: In July 2005, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration investigated tropical cyclogenesis, hurricane structure, and intensity change in the eastern North Pacific and western Atlantic using its ER-2 high-altitude research aircraft. The campaign, called the Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) experiment, was conducted in conjunction with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Hurricane Research Division's Intensity Forecasting Experiment. A number of in situ and remote sensor datasets were collected inside and above four tropical cyclones representing a broad spectrum of tropical cyclone intensity and development in diverse environments. While the TCSP datasets directly address several key hypotheses governing tropical cyclone formation, including the role of vertical wind shear, dynamics of convective bursts, and upscale growth of the initial vortex, two of the storms sampled were also unusually strong, early season storms. Highlights from the genesis missions are described in this article, along with some of the unexpected results from the campaign. Interesting observations include an extremely intense, highly electrified convective tower in the eyewall of Hurricane Emily and a broad region of mesoscale subsidence detected in the lower stratosphere over landfalling Tropical Storm Gert.
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2007 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be "fair use" under Section 107 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law (17 USC, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the Society's permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form on servers, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statements, requires written permission or license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policies, available from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or amspubs@ametsoc.org. Permission to place a copy of this work on this server has been provided by the AMS. The AMS does not guarantee that the copy provided here is an accurate copy of the published work.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7125sxn
Publisher's Version: 10.1175/BAMS-88-6-867
Author(s):
  • J. Halverson
  • M. Black
  • S. Braun
  • D. Cecil
  • M. Goodman
  • Andrew Heymsfield - NCAR/UCAR
  • G. Heymsfield
  • R. Hood
  • T. Krishnamurti
  • G. McFarquhar
  • M. Mahoney
  • J. Molinari
  • R. Rogers
  • J. Turk
  • C. Velden
  • D.-L Zhang
  • E. Zipser
  • R. Kahar
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