Validation and calibration of MSU/AMSU measurements and radiosonde observations using GPS RO data for improving stratospheric and tropospheric temperature trend analysis

AMS Citation:
Ho, S. -peng, C. -Z. Zou, and Y. -H. Kuo, 2015: Validation and calibration of MSU/AMSU measurements and radiosonde observations using GPS RO data for improving stratospheric and tropospheric temperature trend analysis. AGU Fall Meeting 2015, American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, CA, US.
Date:2015-12-16
Resource Type:conference material
Title:Validation and calibration of MSU/AMSU measurements and radiosonde observations using GPS RO data for improving stratospheric and tropospheric temperature trend analysis
Abstract: On board NASA Aqua satellite, the hyper-spectral infrared sounding from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is the first of a new generation of operational remote sensors for upwelling atmospheric emission that provide excellent temperature and water vapor retrievals at middle atmosphere, which has significant impacts on short-term numerical weather forecasts. Also on board NASA Aqua satellite, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) measurements provide the all weather temperature and water vapor profiles which are used as the first guess for AIRS inversion algorithm. However, due to lack of absolute on orbit calibration, both AIRS and AMSU also exhibit biases in retrieving atmospheric temperatures and moistures when compared with in situ measurements. These retrieval biases have diverse and complex dependencies on the temperature/moisture being measured, the season and geographical location, surface conditions, and sensor temperature, which is difficult to quantify. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the usefulness of Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) data to serve as a climate calibration observatory in orbit to calibrate and validate AIRS and AMSU measurements. In this study, we use COSMIC RO data to simulate AMSU and AIRS brightness temperatures for the lower stratosphere (TLS) and compare them to AMSU TLS and those of AIRS brightness temperatures at the same height. Our analysis shows that because RO data do not contain mission-dependent biases and orbit drift errors, and are not affected by on-orbit heating and cooling of the satellite component, they are very useful to identify the AMSU time/location dependent biases for different NOAA missions and possible long term drift of the AIRS retrieved temperatures.
Peer Review:Non-refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7j38vdw
Author(s):
  • Shu-peng Ho - NCAR/UCAR
  • Cheng-Zhi Zou
  • Ying-Hwa Kuo - NCAR/UCAR
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