The impact of atmospheric aerosols on precipitation from deep organized convection: A prescribed-flow modeling study using double-moment bulk microphysics

AMS Citation:
Slawinska, J., W. W. Grabowski, and H. Morrison, 2009: The impact of atmospheric aerosols on precipitation from deep organized convection: A prescribed-flow modeling study using double-moment bulk microphysics. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 135, 1906-1913, doi:10.1002/qj.450.
Date:2009-10-01
Resource Type:article
Title:The impact of atmospheric aerosols on precipitation from deep organized convection: A prescribed-flow modeling study using double-moment bulk microphysics
Abstract: This note discusses the results of numerical simulations in which a prescribed-flow model is merged with a double-moment warm-rain and ice microphysics scheme to investigate the impact of microphysical processes on precipitation from deep organized convection. The prescribed two-dimensional flow mimics an idealized squall line, with a narrow region of strong convective updraft and much wider region of weak stratiform updraft overlaying a stratiform downdraft. To cover the broad range of conditions that are possible for a squall line as well as to explore precipitation dependence on different parameters, 25 pairs of simulations are performed. Simulated cases differ in the dynamics (e.g. changing the updraft strength or large-scale shear), thermodynamics (e.g. changing the inflow sounding) or microphysics (e.g. changing the collision efficiencies). Each pair features cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in either a pristine or polluted environment. Total surface precipitation and partitioning between convective and stratiform precipitation in each pair appears to be almost the same, with the difference being typically a few tenths of 1%. However, the dynamical and thermodynamical parameters do affect the precipitation significantly. It follows that the surface precipitation from organized convection can differ between pristine and polluted environments only through the feedback of CCN on cloud dynamics. In this feedback, small differences in the latent heating for the same flow pattern lead to different flow patterns in subsequent squall-line evolution. Details of this feedback need to be investigated using a dynamical model.
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2009 Royal Meteorological Society.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d75d8svk
Publisher's Version: 10.1002/qj.450
Author(s):
  • Joanna Slawinska
  • Wojciech Grabowski - NCAR/UCAR
  • Hugh Morrison - NCAR/UCAR
  • Random Profile

    EDUC/INSTRC DESGNR II

    Recent & Upcoming Visitors