The effects of past hurricane experiences on evacuation intentions through risk perception and efficacy beliefs: A mediation analysis

AMS Citation:
Demuth, J. L., R. E. Morss, J. K. Lazo, and C. Trumbo, 2016: The effects of past hurricane experiences on evacuation intentions through risk perception and efficacy beliefs: A mediation analysis. Weather, Climate, and Society, 8, 327-344, doi:10.1175/WCAS-D-15-0074.1.
Date:2016-10-01
Resource Type:article
Title:The effects of past hurricane experiences on evacuation intentions through risk perception and efficacy beliefs: A mediation analysis
Abstract: Individuals' past experiences with a hazard can encompass many different aspects, which can influence how they judge and respond to a future hurricane risk. This study, which utilizes survey data from coastal residents who are at risk from hurricanes, adds to understanding of past hazard experience in two ways. First, it examines six different aspects of people's past hurricane experiences and the relationships among them. Then, it draws on risk theories of behavioral responses to explore how these different experiences influence people's evacuation intentions for a hypothetical hurricane as mediated through multiple dimensions of risk perception (cognitive, negative affective) and efficacy beliefs (self efficacy, response efficacy). The results suggest that people can experience emotional or otherwise severe impacts from a hurricane even if they do not have experiences with evacuation, property damage, or financial loss. The results also reveal that different past hurricane experiences operated through different combinations of mediating variables to influence evacuation intentions. Some of these processes enhanced intentions; for instance, experience with evacuation, financial loss, or emotional impacts heightened negative affective risk perceptions, which increased evacuation intentions. Other processes dampened evacuation intentions; for instance, people with past hurricane-related emotional impacts had lower self efficacy, which decreased evacuation intentions. In some cases, these enhancing and dampening processes competed. Exploring people's different past weather experiences and the mechanisms by which they can influence future behaviors is important for more deeply understanding populations at risk and how they respond to weather threats.
Peer Review:Refereed
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OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7hm5b6q
Publisher's Version: 10.1175/WCAS-D-15-0074.1
Author(s):
  • Julie L. Demuth - NCAR/UCAR
  • Rebecca E. Morss - NCAR/UCAR
  • Jeffrey K. Lazo - NCAR/UCAR
  • Craig Trumbo
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