Staff Notes Daily Calendar Events

Monday, January 25, 2021 - 3:30pm

ACOM VIRTUAL SEMINAR

TITLE: Impacts of Winter Stratospheric Variability on the Global Middle Atmosphere

PRESENTER: Anne Smith, National Center of Atmospheric Research, Atomspheric Chemisty Observations & Modleing Laboratory

ABSTRACT: Observations and global models have shown that the summer stratosphere and mesosphere vary in response to dynamical activity in the winter stratosphere. Previous analysis with WACCM found that the response is associated with a short-lived perturbation to the global wave-driven circulation that arises to maintain balance in the presence of impulsive dynamical forcing by wintertime planetary waves. In this talk, I will present results showing the response in near-global observations from SABER for 2002-2020. The results show the sign, magnitude, distribution, and persistence of the perturbations in temperature, ozone, and water. In combination, these perturbations give a consistent picture of the induced circulation and its impacts. The SABER results agree with those simulated by WACCM in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere but show differences in the upper mesosphere.

Monday, January 25, 2020, 3:30pm (MT) Live Webcast: http://operations.ucar.edu/live-acom

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Mary Anne Cervantes (mcervant@ucar.edu) at x1484
Hosting lab/division or program:
ACOM
Friday, January 22, 2021 - 9:00am

All staff are invited to join Tony Busalacchi and other members of NCAR, UCAR, and UCP leadership for a virtual town hall Friday, January 22, 9-10:30 a.m. to address any new questions you have, including those about our ongoing response to COVID-19.

We will again be using Slido for staff to submit questions and “upvote” questions already submitted, both before and during the town hall. You can also submit questions to townhall@ucar.edu and the moderators will then post the questions to Slido.

The webcast link will be sent in an all-staff email from Tony, so please check your inbox on Thursday, January 21, for that link. For staff who are unable to watch the webcast live, the town hall will be recorded and made available to staff.


Posted by Cassie Frankovich (cfrankovich@ucar.edu) at x2104
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 11:00am

Title: Seasonal Climatology, Variability, and Temporal Characteristics of Caribbean Rainfall

Speaker: Carlos Martinez, Columbia University

Date: Tuesday 26 January 2021

Time: 11 am - 12 pm

To join via Zoom contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu

Abstract: The Caribbean is a topographically complex region that heavily relies on its rainfall cycle for its economic and societal needs. This makes the Caribbean especially susceptible to hydro-meteorological disasters (e.g., droughts and floods). Previous studies have investigated the seasonal cycle and variability of rainfall in the Caribbean with monthly or longer resolutions that often mask the seasonal transitions and regional differences of rainfall. In addition, temporal characteristics (e.g., onset, demise), which are useful for farmers, have yet to be investigated. To address this, the study conducts principal component, moisture budget, and composite analyses to better understand the Caribbean rainfall cycle and its variability using 38 rain gauges and ERA-Interim Reanalysis over the region. The seasonal climatology of Caribbean rainfall hinges on two main facilitators of moisture convergence: the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the North Atlantic Subtropical High, and two regional modifiers of moisture convergence: the Atlantic Warm Pool, and the Caribbean Low-Level Jet. The spatial and temporal evolution of these dynamical mechanisms vary across the five regions of the Caribbean. The early and late rainfall seasons of the Caribbean are impacted in distinctly different ways by two different, and largely independent large-scale phenomena: the North Atlantic Oscillation, and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, respectively. Onsets and demises that are calculated based on yearly rainfall seasonal means effectively characterize the seasonal evolution of mean onsets and demises in the Caribbean. Onsets and demises that are calculated based on the climatological seasonal mean resemble the variability of seasonal rainfall totals in the Caribbean. The study has important implications for prediction of rainfall and modeling capabilities.

For more information contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Tracy Baker (tbaker@ucar.edu) at x1366
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 11:00am

Title: Off-equatorial deep cycle turbulence forced by Tropical Instability Waves in the equatorial Pacific

Speaker: Deepak Cherian, NCAR

Date: Tuesday 19 January 2021

Time: 11 am -12 pm

To join via Zoom, contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu

Abstract: The equatorial Pacific cold tongue is a site of large heat absorption by the ocean. This heat uptake is enabled by a daily cycle of turbulence beneath the mixed layer (deep-cycle turbulence) that removes heat from the sea surface and deposits it in the upper flank of the Equatorial Undercurrent. Deep-cycle turbulence results when turbulence is triggered daily in sheared and stratified flow that is marginally stable (gradient Richardson number Ri ≈ 0.25). Deep-cycle turbulence has been observed on numerous occasions in the cold tongue at 0°N, 140°W, and may be modulated by Tropical Instability Waves (TIWs).Here we use a primitive equation regional simulation of the cold tongue to show that deep-cycle turbulence can also occur off the equator within the cold cusps of TIWs where the flow is marginally stable. In the cold cusp, pre-existing equatorial zonal shear $u_z$ is enhanced by horizontal vortex stretching near the equator, and subsequently modified by horizontal vortex tilting terms to generate meridional shear $v_z$ off the equator. Turbulence in the sheared flow of the cold cusp is triggered daily by the descent of the surface mixing layer associated with the weakening of the stabilizing surface buoyancy flux in the afternoon.Observational evidence for off-equatorial deep-cycle turbulence is restricted to a few CTD casts, which when combined with shear from shipboard ADCP data suggest the presence of marginally stable flow in TIW cold cusps. This study motivates further observational campaigns to characterize the modulation of deep-cycle turbulence by TIWs both on and off the equator.

For more information contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu, 303-497-1366

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Tracy Baker (tbaker@ucar.edu) at x1366
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Tuesday, March 16, 2021 - 11:00am

Title: The challenge of energy budget closure in Earth system models

Speaker: Peter Lauritzen, NCAR

Date: Tuesday 16 March 2021

Time: 11 am - 12 pm

For zoom information please contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu

Abstract:  A closed total energy (TE) budget is of utmost importance in coupled climate system modeling. In the case of the atmosphere it involves physical parameterizations, the dynamical core solver, the coupling between the two (referred to as physics-dynamics coupling) and fluxes from the surface components. The budget is rather complicated partly due to the fact that all parts of an Earth System Model are involved and, even on a continuous level, it is not straightforward how to formulate energetically and thermodynamically consistent equations for a moist atmosphere containing falling hydrometeors.A detailed analysis of the spurious sources/sinks of TE in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is given. This includes spurious sources/sinks associated with the parameterization suite, the dynamical core, TE definition discrepancies, and physics‐dynamics coupling. It will also be discussed how to move towards a more comprehensive and thermodynamically consistent formulation of TE in CAM.

For more information contact Tracy Baker, tbaker@ucar.edu, 303-497-1366

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Tracy Baker (tbaker@ucar.edu) at x1366
Hosting lab/division or program:
CGD
Will this event be webcast?
No
Wednesday, January 20, 2021 - 1:00pm

Title: Aperture: A System for Interactive Visualization of Voluminous Geospatial Data

Speaker: Kevin Bruhwiler (CSU)

Abstract: The growth in observational data volumes over the past decade has occurred alongside a need to make sense of the phenomena that underpin them. Visualization is a key component of the data wrangling process that precedes the analyses that informs these insights. The crux of this study is interactive visualizations of spatiotemporal phenomena from voluminous datasets. Spatiotemporal visualizations of voluminous datasets introduce challenges relating to interactivity, overlaying multiple datasets and dynamic feature selection, resource capacity constraints, and scaling. Our methodology to address these challenges relies on a novel mix of algorithms and systems innovations working in concert to ensure effective apportioning and amortization of workloads and enables interactivity during visualizations. In particular our research prototype, Aperture, leverages sketching algorithms, effective query predicate generation and evaluation, avoids performance hotspots, harnesses coprocessors for hardware acceleration, and convolutional neural network based encoders to render visualizations while preserving responsiveness and interactivity. Finally, we also explore issues in effective containerization to support visualization workloads. We also report on several empirical benchmarks that profile and demonstrate the suitability of our methodology to preserve interactivity while utilizing resources effectively to scale.

Biography: Kevin Bruhwiler is a Graduate Research Assistant at Colorado State University. He grew up in Boulder, Colorado and received a Master's in Computer Science in 2020 for work in the fields of distributed systems, big data, and geospatial data visualization. He is planning to pursue a PhD in Computer Science at the University of Southern California.

Date: January 20, 2021 / 1-2pm MT - VIRTUAL

Live Link: https://operations.ucar.edu/live2-CISL

Contact taysia@ucar.edu to be added to the calendar event.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Taysia Peterson (taysia@ucar.edu) at x1222
Hosting lab/division or program:
CISL
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 3:30pm

SPEAKER:      Chris Rattray - Masters Student, School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma

DATE:              January 19, 2021

TIME:               3:30 - 4:30 pm

WEBCAST:     operations.ucar.edu/live-eol (Will be recorded and uploaded to the EOL Youtube channel)

QUESTIONS:  During the seminar, you will have the opportunity to ask questions via Slido

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the evolution of the Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet (NLLJ) as warm, moist flow returns following a cold frontal passage. The study utilizes the ERA-5 reanalysis and 3-h radiosonde data taken during the International H2O Project field campaign. This talk will present new insight into the processes controlling the NLLJ intensity and structure including the possible role of variations in water vapor and radiative processes. The results also show that two mechanisms resulted in the destabilization of the nocturnal environment, weak (2 cm/s) ascent and differential advection, with implications for the eastward movement of nocturnal convection over the region.

If you have any questions about the seminar, reach out to Jacquie Witte or Melissa Ward.

 

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Melissa Ward (mward@ucar.edu) at x8713
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 3:30pm

SPEAKER:                Prof. April Hiscox, Department of Geography, University of South Carolina

DATE:                        January 26, 2021

TIME:                         3:30 - 4:30 pm

WEBCAST LINK:     operations.ucar.edu/live-eol

RECORDING:           This webcast will be recorded and uploaded to the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory YouTube Channel

QUESTIONS:            Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions via Slido immediately following the talk.

 

ABSTRACT

The Stable Atmospheric Variability And Transport (SAVANT) field campaign, collected data to understand the atmospheric characteristics during nocturnal drainage flows in shallow gullies. SAVANT was focused on understanding the complexities of the stable boundary layer. The campaign produced a rich dataset from ISS and ISFS facilities. Two Aerosol lidars and one Doppler lidar monitored the evolution of flow structure and movement of a tracer plume. This presentation will provide results of the initial investigation of drainage flow occurrences and their structure from the post-processed LiDAR data. Some of the key differences in turbulence observed due to the harvesting of crops will also be presented.

 

If you have any questions about the seminar, reach out to Jacquie Witte or Melissa Ward.

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium

Posted by Melissa Ward (mward@ucar.edu) at x8713
Wednesday, March 3, 2021 - 2:00pm

From solar atmosphere to tokamak divertor: plasma diagnostics and spectroscopic techniques

The emission of photons and all spectral lines have encoded information to diagnose the physical and chemical status of the emitting source, carrying the signature of the underlying plasma parameters. Such an approach is suitable not only in an astrophysical context, but also for laboratory fusion plasmas. Atomic physics provides the link that enables the observed spectra to be interpreted in terms of the properties of the source from which they arise, whether they originate in an experiment on Earth, such as a laser or tokamak device, or in an astronomical object, ranging from the Sun and stars to planetary nebulae and interstellar medium. The increasing capabilities of the current and new space-borne instrumentation (e.g. Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, Solar Orbiter, Parker Solar Probe) and controlled fusion devices (e.g. Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak Super-X upgrade divertor, International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, Spherical Tokamak for Energy Production, DEMOnstration Power Station), require atomic modelling and the derived spectroscopic techniques to be regularly revised and upgraded. The present work will strongly exploit this interdisciplinary link between laboratory and astrophysics plasma environments. Atomic data requirements and their accuracy will be discussed, concentrating on the applications to the analysis of the solar upper atmosphere emission and the investigation of controlled fusion plasmas in a tokamak divertor. An example of the exploitation of a common methodology for the detection and assessment of non-equilibrium processes will be described. This will show that the derived atomic data allow equivalent prediction in non-stationary transport regimes and dynamic conditions of both the solar atmosphere and tokamak divertor.

https://meet.google.com/idt-ncsy-sfq

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 2:00pm

MSFC Solar Sounding Rockets – A review of recent missions and scientific results

Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville AL has developed numerous solar sounding rocket payloads. In this talk, we will step through some of the scientific and technological achievements of recent Marshall lead missions including a review of the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C 2.1) and the Chromospheric Layer SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP 2) instruments and the scientific results they have produced.  We will also discuss the status and progress of some exciting new missions including the Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrometer (MaGIXS) and the Full-Sun UV Rocket Spectrometer (FURST), which are set to launch in the near future along with the challenges that come with sounding rocket payload development.

meet.google.com/idt-ncsy-sfq

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Wednesday, January 27, 2021 - 2:00pm

Understanding solar wind formation by identifying the origins of in situ observations

Authors: S. Wallace, C.N. Arge, N.M. Viall, S. Di Matteo, S.I Jones

Solar wind formation can be separated into three physical steps – source, release, and acceleration -- that each leave distinct observational signatures on plasma parcels. The Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model driven by Air Force Data Assimilative Photospheric Flux Transport (ADAPT) time-dependent photospheric field maps now has the ability to connect in situ observations more rigorously to their precise source at the Sun, allowing us to investigate the physical processes involved in solar wind formation. In this talk, I will highlight my PhD dissertation research in which we use the ADAPT-WSA model to either characterize the solar wind emerging from specific sources, or investigate the formation process of various solar wind populations. In the first study, we test the well-known inverse relationship between expansion factor (fs) and observed solar wind speed (vobs) for solar wind that emerges from a large sampling of pseudostreamers, to investigate if field line expansion plays a physical role in accelerating the solar wind from this source region. We find that there is no correlation between fs and vobs at pseudostreamer cusps. In the second study, we determine the source locations of the first identified quasiperiodic density structures (PDSs) inside 0.6 au. Our modeling provides confirmation of these events forming via magnetic reconnection both near to and far from the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) -- a direct test of the Separatrix-web (S-web) theory of slow solar wind formation. In the final study, we use our methodology to identify the source regions of the first observations from the Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission. Our modeling provided confirmation that the closest to the Sun observed coronal mass ejection (CME) to date was a streamer blowout. We close with future ways that ADAPT-WSA can be used to test outstanding questions of solar wind formation.

meet.google.com/idt-ncsy-sfq

Type of event:
Seminar/Symposium
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Sheryl Shapiro (sheryls@ucar.edu) at x1567
Hosting lab/division or program:
HAO
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 12:00pm

Are you interested in writing opinion pieces, blogs, or other articles for broad audiences, including experts in different geoscience disciplines and the science-interested public? The UCAR Communications Office is sponsoring a lunch-and-learn session with Eos editor-in-chief Heather Goss and science editor Tim Oleson. They will discuss how to write compelling and informative pieces for Eos. Their advice can also be applied to writing more broadly.

The online session will run from noon to 1 p.m. on Thursday, January 28. Please register in advance: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMpd-2qrD0vG9DMMfPo6eqhSIQyi7L...

 

 


Posted by David Hosansky (hosansky@ucar.edu) at x8611
Hosting lab/division or program:
Communications
Tuesday, January 26, 2021 - 2:30pm

Are you interested in K-12 education and public outreach? If so, please join your colleagues in an online Zoom discussion about this topic on Tuesday, January 26 from 2:30-3:30 pm. During this meeting, we will share updates on education and outreach efforts happening across the organization, discuss ideas for collaborations across groups, and discuss new ideas for education and outreach efforts we want to consider doing in the future.

To RSVP, please send an email to Shaun Bush at sbush@ucar.edu and you'll be added to the calendar invite.

If you would like to discuss or share anything at the meeting, please add it to our agenda. This is a living document that you can fill out before and during the meeting.

In addition, if you haven't already signed up for the email list for this group (k12@ucar.edu), please email Emily Snode-Brenneman at emilysb@ucar.edu and let her know that you would like to be added to the list to get notifications about education and outreach opportunities.

We hope to see you at the meeting!

Building:
Virtual

Posted by Emily Snode-Brenneman (emilysb@ucar.edu) at x2579
Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 12:00pm

Contracts invite all interested staff to participate in the Procurement’s Request for Proposal (RFP) Evaluation Process lunch and learn session taking place today, January 19th.

Date: January 19, 2021 Time:  Noon – 1:00 pm Join with Google Meet

The session will not be recorded, so please forward this announcement to anyone else within your labs/programs that you think may be interested.

Type of event:
Tutorial/Training

Posted by Alia Khoury (akhoury@ucar.edu) at x8894
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 1:00pm

Eric Gilleland - National Center for Atmospheric Research

Spatial forecast verification has exploded into an increasingly complicated set of tools for either automatically assessing forecast performance or providing diagnostic plots and other information.  A set of tools that breaks that mold by providing simple, easy-to-understand summary measures has also gained some traction in recent years, and are now included, for example, in the MET software.  No single summary will provide all the information needed and each will have its pros and cons.  Recent work has demonstrated some common pitfalls with each of them.  Predicated off of this work, a new summary measure is proposed that does not suffer from any of these flaws, while providing useful information about forecast performance.

Thursday, February 18, 2021 | 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Live webcast - https://operations.ucar.edu/live-ral


Posted by Jenny Bolton (jbolton@ucar.edu) at x2852
Friday, January 29, 2021 - 3:30pm

We are celebrating Rita Roberts' remarkable 38-yr career on January 29th, 3:30 – 5:00 virtually on zoom.

Rita was one of the original five employees of a research group that grew to become the Research Applications Program (RAP) in the 1980s, evolving into RAL in 2004. She was a member of the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) field program on microbursts and then the wind-shear detection-system development projects, alongside team members Jim Wilson, Cindy Mueller, Cathy Kessinger, Kim Elmore, Bill Mahoney, and John McCarthy.  Her research results on the evolution of microbursts are used in the radar-based operational system that warns pilots of dangerous wind-shear conditions when taking off and landing. Rita is internationally known for her research on convective storm nowcasting. Recently, she has been deeply involved in research activities to better understand the evolution of thunderstorms over Lake Victoria in Africa that cause thousands of lake-user deaths. She is a radar scientist known around the world for both her outstanding science and warm and welcoming personality.

Please join us by connecting to the zoom link below.  Several colleagues are scheduled to speak, but due to time constraints we can't schedule everyone, so please contact Rita directly to wish her well on her retirement.

Zoom coordinates for retirement event: https://zoom.us/j/95078703363?pwd=K0t2bXZQNndKVFhvckFTbWRyeCtHdz09

Meeting ID: 950 7870 3363

Passcode: 673714

If you would like to contribute photos or quotes to her memory book, please send them to griggs@ucar.edu by Jan 18th.

Type of event:
Celebration
Building:
Virtual

Posted by Karen Slater (griggs@ucar.edu) at x2740
Hosting lab/division or program:
RAL
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 9:00am

Thursday, January 28, 2021

Consultant:

Rhet Belcher

9:00am - 4:00pm

For more information, contact hopek@ucar.edu

Type of event:
Wellness/Benefits

Posted by Nancy Hopek (hopek@ucar.edu) at x8704
Hosting lab/division or program:
Human Resources
Will this event be webcast?
No
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 9:00am

Investigators: Join us at today’s virtual Investigator COI in Kuali workshop from 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. MST if you would like assistance completing your Investigator Conflict of Interest (COI) disclosure for the first time. Even though each session is scheduled for an hour, it will likely take you less time than that. Please register in Workday for session details.

Unable to attend today’s session? The complete workshop schedule is available on our Kuali User Support site, along with a video about the process and step-by-step guides.

As a reminder, Investigators need to submit their annual Investigator COI in Kuali by April 1, 2021, unless they need to submit earlier due to:

  • Proposals requesting funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) or Public Health Service (PHS), either directly or through another entity (pass-through funding);
  • Acceptance by Contracts of federally-funded awards (direct and pass-through), or as otherwise required by an award’s terms and conditions; and/or,
  • A new SFI is acquired.

 


Posted by Heather Hoyer (hhoyer@ucar.edu) at x8574

Quick Facts

NCAR is managed by the nonprofit University Corporation for Atmospheric Research on behalf of NSF and the UCAR university community.

  • NCAR is not a federal agency and its employees are not part of the federal personnel system.
  • Our activities complement those of the federal agencies and we work closely with them.

More about us