On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of Northern Hemisphere geostationary satellites. (Part 1)

AMS Citation:
Barre, J., D. P. Edwards, H. M. Worden, A. Da Silva, and W. Lahoz, 2015: On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of Northern Hemisphere geostationary satellites. (Part 1). Atmospheric Environment, 113, 63-77, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2015.04.069.
Date:2015-07-01
Resource Type:article
Title:On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of Northern Hemisphere geostationary satellites. (Part 1)
Abstract: By the end of the current decade, there are plans to deploy several geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite missions for atmospheric composition over North America, East Asia and Europe with additional missions proposed. Together, these present the possibility of a constellation of geostationary platforms to achieve continuous time-resolved high-density observations over continental domains for mapping pollutant sources and variability at diurnal and local scales. In this paper, we use a novel approach to sample a very high global resolution model (GEOS-5 at 7 km horizontal resolution) to produce a dataset of synthetic carbon monoxide pollution observations representative of those potentially obtainable from a GEO satellite constellation with predicted measurement sensitivities based on current remote sensing capabilities. Part 1 of this study focuses on the production of simulated synthetic measurements for air quality OSSEs (Observing System Simulation Experiments). We simulate carbon monoxide nadir retrievals using a technique that provides realistic measurements with very low computational cost. We discuss the sampling methodology: the projection of footprints and areas of regard for geostationary geometries over each of the North America, East Asia and Europe regions; the regression method to simulate measurement sensitivity; and the measurement error simulation. A detailed analysis of the simulated observation sensitivity is performed, and limitations of the method are discussed. We also describe impacts from clouds, showing that the efficiency of an instrument making atmospheric composition measurements on a geostationary platform is dependent on the dominant weather regime over a given region and the pixel size resolution. These results demonstrate the viability of the “instrument simulator” step for an OSSE to assess the performance of a constellation of geostationary satellites for air quality measurements. We describe the OSSE results in a follow up paper (Part 2 of this study).
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2015 Elsevier.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7h70h1v
Publisher's Version: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2015.04.069
Author(s):
  • Jerome Barre - NCAR/UCAR
  • David Edwards - NCAR/UCAR
  • Helen Worden - NCAR/UCAR
  • Arlindo Da Silva
  • William Lahoz
  • Random Profile

    PROJ SCIENTIST IV

    Recent & Upcoming Visitors