The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX): Observations and modeling of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophilia and Rita (2005)

AMS Citation:
Houze, R. A., and Coauthors, 2006: The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX): Observations and modeling of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophilia and Rita (2005). Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 87, 1503-1521, doi:10.1175/BAMS-87-11-1503.
Date:2006-11-01
Resource Type:article
Title:The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX): Observations and modeling of Hurricanes Katrina, Ophilia and Rita (2005)
Abstract: The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) used three P3 aircraft aided by high-resolution numerical modeling and satellite communications to investigate the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, and Rita. The aim was to increase the understanding of tropical cyclone intensity change by interactions between a tropical cyclone's inner core and rainbands. All three aircraft had dual-Doppler radars, with the Electra Doppler Radar (ELDORA) on board the Naval Research Laboratory's P3 aircraft, providing particularly detailed Doppler radar data. Numerical model forecasts helped plan the aircraft missions, and innovative communications and data transfer in real time allowed the flights to be coordinated from a ground-based operations center. The P3 aircraft released approximately 600 dropsondes in locations targeted for optimal coordination with the Doppler radar data, as guided by the operations center. The storms were observed in all stages of development, from tropical depression to category 5 hurricane. The data from RAINEX are readily available through an online Field Catalog and RAINEX Data Archive. The RAINEX data-set is illustrated in this article by a preliminary analysis of Hurricane Rita, which was documented by multiaircraft flights on five days 1) while a tropical storm, 2) while rapidly intensifying to a category 5 hurricane, 3) during an eye-wall replacement, 4) when the hurricane became asymmetric upon encountering environmental shear, and 5) just prior to landfall.
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:Copyright 2006 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be "fair use" under Section 107 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law (17 USC, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the Society's permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form on servers, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statements, requires written permission or license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policies, available from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or amspubs@ametsoc.org. Permission to place a copy of this work on this server has been provided by the AMS. The AMS does not guarantee that the copy provided here is an accurate copy of the published work.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d78k79rq
Publisher's Version: 10.1175/BAMS-87-11-1503
Author(s):
  • Robert Houze - NCAR/UCAR
  • Jasmine Cetrone
  • Rita Brodzik
  • Shuyi Chen
  • Wei Zhao
  • Wen-chau Lee - NCAR/UCAR
  • James Moore - NCAR/UCAR
  • Gregory Stossmeister - NCAR/UCAR
  • Michael Bell - NCAR/UCAR
  • Robert Rogers
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