Sensitivity of biogenic secondary organic aerosols to future climate change at regional scales: An online coupled simulation

AMS Citation:
Jiang, X., Z. -L. Yang, H. Liao, and C. Wiedinmyer, 2010: Sensitivity of biogenic secondary organic aerosols to future climate change at regional scales: An online coupled simulation. Atmospheric Environment, 44, 4891-4907, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.08.032.
Date:2010-12-01
Resource Type:article
Title:Sensitivity of biogenic secondary organic aerosols to future climate change at regional scales: An online coupled simulation
Abstract: Biogenic emissions and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are strongly dependent on climatic conditions. To understand the SOA levels and their sensitivity to future climate change in the United States (U.S.), we present a modeling work with the consideration of SOA formation from the oxidation of biogenic emissions with atmospheric oxidants (e.g., OH, O₃, and NO₃). The model simulation for the present-day climate is evaluated against satellite and ground-based aerosol measurements. Although the model underestimates aerosol concentrations over the northwestern U.S. due to the lack of fire emissions in the model simulations, overall, the SOA results agree well with previous studies. Comparing with the available measurements of organic carbon (OC) concentrations, we found that the amount of SOA in OC is significant, with the ratio ranging from 0.1 to 0.5/0.6. The enhanced modeling system driven by global climate model output was also applied for two three-year one-month simulations (July, 2001-2003 and 2051-2053) to examine the sensitivity of SOA to future climate change. Under the future two emissions scenarios (A1B and A2), future temperature changes are predicted to increase everywhere in the U.S., but with different degrees of increase in different regions. As a result of climate change in the future, biogenic emissions are predicted to increase everywhere, with the largest increase (~20%) found in the southeastern and northwestern U.S. under the A1B scenario. Changes in SOA are not identical with those in biogenic emissions. Under the A1B scenario, the biggest increase in SOA is found over Texas, with isoprene emissions being the major contributor to SOA formation. The range of change varies from 5% over the southeast region to 26% over Texas. The changes in either biogenic emissions or SOA under the two climate scenarios are different due to the differences in climatic conditions. Our results also suggest that future SOA concentrations are also influenced by several other factors such as the partitioning coefficients, the atmospheric oxidative capability, primary organic carbon aerosols and anthropogenic emissions.
Peer Review:Refereed
Copyright Information:An edited version of this paper was published by Elsevier. Copyright 2010 Elsevier.
OpenSky citable URL: ark:/85065/d7pv6kt1
Publisher's Version: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.08.032
Author(s):
  • Xiaoyan Jiang
  • Zong-Liang Yang
  • Hong Liao
  • Christine Wiedinmyer - NCAR/UCAR
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